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April 2017             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – April 2017

Welcome to the April 2017 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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March 2017             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – March 2017

Welcome to the March 2017 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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February 2017             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – February 2017

Welcome to the February 2017 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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January 2017             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – January 2017

Welcome to the January 2017 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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December 2016             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol Alert 2016 : The Year in Review

 

November 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – November 2016

Welcome to the November 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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October 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – October 2016

Welcome to the October 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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September 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – September 2016

Welcome to the September 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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July 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – July 2016

Welcome to the July 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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June 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – June 2016

Welcome to the June 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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May 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – May 2016

Welcome to the May 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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April 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – April 2016

Welcome to the April 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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March 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – March 2016

Welcome to the March 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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February 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – February 2016

Welcome to the February 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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January 2016             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – January 2016

Welcome to the January 2016 edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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November 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – November 2015

Welcome to the November edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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October 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – October 2015

Welcome to the October edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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September 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – September 2015

Welcome to the September edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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August 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – August 2015

Welcome to the August edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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July 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – July 2015

Welcome to the July edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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June 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – June 2015

Welcome to the June edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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May 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – May 2015

Welcome to the May edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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April 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – April 2015

Welcome to the Apriledition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.

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March 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – March 2015

Welcome to the Marchedition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters.In this issue,speculation surrounds the 2015 Budget; what will happen to alcohol duty?Other articles include:Lords join calls for a newer and more powerfulEU Alcohol Strategy; and theScottish football alcohol ban comes under pressureto be lifted.

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February 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – February 2015

Welcome to the February edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue, Cllr Jonathan McShane explains why the Local Government Association is calling for a slice of alcohol duty to combat misuse at local level. In other news: the Irish Government announces its Public Health (Alcohol) Bill; QC Aidan Robertson finds no legal obstacle to minimum unit pricing in Scotland; and the Labour Party pledges to target cheap cider in order to protect children in its Public Health Paper.Please click on the article titles to read them, or alternatively download a PDF version of our newsletter by clicking on the cover image. We hope you enjoy this edition.

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January 2015             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – January 2015

Welcome to the January edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue, Dr Richard de Visser reports the findings from an independent study into the effects of Dry January on participants' drinking habits. In other news: the Alcohol Health Alliance calls for a ban on alcohol sponsorship of sports; Public Health Minister Jane Ellison MP expresses "frustration" at not being able to give tax breaks to low-alcohol drinks; while Shadow Health Minister Luciana Berger MP pledges the Labour Party will "stand up to vested interests" on alcohol policy.Please click on the article titles to read them, or alternatively download a PDF version of our newsletter by clicking on the cover image. We hope you enjoy this edition.

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November 2014             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – November 2014

Welcome to the November edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue, acclaimed public health expert Professor Sir Michael Marmot gives his thoughts on our new report "Alcohol, health inequalities and the harm paradox", which asks why lower socioeconomic groups experience greater health problems due to alcohol despite drinking less than those on higher incomes. Other articles include: Stark north-south divide over admissions and mortality rates for alcoholic liver disease, approval of a controversial new drug for treating alcohol dependence; and remembering 50 years of THINK! drink-drive campaigns.

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October 2014             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – October 2014

Welcome to the October edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue, historian Dr Peter Catterall discusses the forgotten temperance roots of the Labour Party's history in his essay "Labour and the politics of alcohol: The decline of a cause", and solicitor Jonathan Goodliffe provides an analysis of the current legal challenge to minimum pricing in the European courts​. Other articles include: councils across the North East, the Association of Chief Police Officers, and the British Medical Association demanding urgent action on alcohol; industry figures declaring their support for Scottish minimum pricing in Brussels; a new map highlighting regional hotspots for alcohol-related liver disease; and research showing that one in six women drivers in Britain admit drink driving whilst over the limit.

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September 2014             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – September 2014

Welcome to the September edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue, Jennifer Holly (Against Violence & Abuse) and Professor Jonathan Shepherd (Violence Research Group, Cardiff University) give their thoughts on a new report which highlights the harmful relationship between alcohol and domestic abuse. Other articles include: cross-party political support for a manifesto to tackle alcohol misuse; the release of a report backing the Welsh Government's plans to introduce minimum unit pricing; newly published data on underage drinking; and plans to tighten up alcohol licensing laws in Northern Ireland.

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July 2014             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – July 2014

Welcome to the July edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue, Jackie Ballard, the newly appointed Chief Executive of Alcohol Concern, talks about the drinking culture at Westminster during her time as an MP and looks ahead to the future of alcohol policy. Other articles include: researchers discovering a link between sports sponsorship and hazardous drinking; more alcohol pledges added to the Responsibility Deal; a study revealing no heart health benefits from drinking in moderation; nurses debating who should bear the costs of alcohol-related ill health; and survey data on binge drinking from Ireland.

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June 2014             view publication             pdf version

Editorial – June 2014

Welcome to the first online edition of Alcohol Alert, the Institute of Alcohol Studies newsletter, covering the latest updates on UK alcohol policy matters. In this issue we have an audio podcast of our interview with Eric Carlin, Director of Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP), who explains the latest developments in the legal challenge by the Scotch Whisky Association to the Scottish Government on the introduction of minimum unit pricing. There is also news of leaked plans for the Labour Party’s health manifesto, criticism of the latest Public Health Responsibility Deal pledge and updates on alcohol-related violent crime, consumption and mortality figures.

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Issue 3 2013             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol Duty Escalator Scrapped

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Issue 2 2013             view publication             pdf version

Government reads last rites over alcohol strategy

The formal announcement of the evisceration of the Government’s alcohol strategy for England was made by Home Secretary, Teresa May, though the oral announcement to the House of Commons was made by junior minister Jeremy Brown, a Liberal Democrat. It was explained that MUP would not, after all, be implemented, despite this having been proclaimed as the central plank of the alcohol strategy, and despite Prime Minister, David Cameron, having made a personal pledge to introduce MUP.

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Issue 1 2013             view publication             pdf version

Minimum unit alcohol pricing scuppered by Cabinet revolt?

The Coalition Government’s Alcohol Strategy was dealt a severe blow when a Cabinet revolt seemingly forced Prime Minister David Cameron to abandon its key element, the minimum unit pricing of alcohol (MUP). While the decision has still to be formally confirmed, all the indications are that MUP has been abandoned, especially as the news that MUP would not, after all, be implemented in England appeared to be leaked by the Home Office.

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Issue 3 2012             view publication             pdf version

Government launches Alcohol Strategy Consultation

The Coalition Government’s Alcohol Strategy is taking its final shape with the launch of a public consultation on key elements. The exercise centres around minimum unit pricing (MUP) and the question posed is about the level at which the minimum price should be set, not the principle of MUP as such. The consultation also seeks views on banning heavily discounted alcohol such as in multi-buy promotions.

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Issue 2 2012             view publication             pdf version

Health Select Committee calls for tougher controls on alcohol advertising

The House of Commons Health Select Committee has issued a report generally supportive of the Coalition Government’s new Alcohol Strategy for England, but calling for tougher controls on alcohol advertising. The report followed an inquiry which gathered evidence from both public health and industry sources.

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Issue 1 2012             view publication             pdf version

Coalition pioneers minimum unit alcohol pricing

The Prime Minister is leading Government action on tackling drink-fuelled violence and the binge-drinking culture that fuels it. A new Alcohol Strategy sets out a radical approach to turn the tide against irresponsible drinking which costs the UK £21billion a year.

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Issue 3 2011             view publication             pdf version

Cameron backs minimum pricing - But his Health Secretary disagrees

Prime Minister David Cameron has come out in support of minimum unit pricing of alcohol. It was reported in the Daily Telegraph over the Christmas period that the Prime Minister will overrule Cabinet colleagues to push through plans setting a minimum price. Officials have been ordered to draw up proposals for a 40-50p unit floor price in English shops and supermarkets. A Whitehall source told the newspaper: “The Prime Minister has decided that when it comes to alcohol, something pretty radical now has to be done and he is keen on the minimum price.” The source added: “It is complicated how this can be delivered, particularly under European law, but it is clear that the voluntary approach has not worked.”

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Issue 2 2011             view publication             pdf version

Responsibility deal under renewed pressure

Alcohol and health bodies criticise Diageo for funding programme warning of dangers of alcohol in pregnancy as part of the Deal, while Health Secretary suggests supermarkets might do more to help

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Issue 1 2011             view publication             pdf version

Coalition's alcohol policy comes under attack

The Coalition Government’s alcohol policy has come under sustained attack by the Insitutue of Alcohol Studies and other health aligned organisations, which have decided to boycott the Government’s Responsibility Deal with the alcohol industry.

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Issue 3 2010             view publication             pdf version

Scottish Parliament approves Alcohol Bill, but without minimum pricing

Members of the Scottish Parliament approved the Alcohol Bill presented by the Scottish National Party government but minimum pricing of alcohol was rejected. Other key measures that failed to win approval were - banning combination alcohol promotions (eg alcohol with a meal), banning the awarding of loyalty card points for alcohol, a minimum age of 21 for off-sale purchases, and the banning of caffeinated alcoholic beverages.

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Issue 2 2010             view publication             pdf version

Which direction for alcohol policy under the coalition?

The new Coalition Government has immediately courted controversy with the public health community by basing its approach on education rather than regulation, action to improve health being undertaken in close cooperation with the alcohol and food industries as well as public health practitioners and the Third Sector.

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Issue 1 2010             view publication             pdf version

Further support for minimum alcohol pricing

Research from the University of Sheffield, published in the medical journal The Lancet, provides further evidence that increasing alcohol prices could reduce illnesses, premature deaths and healthcare costs.

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Issue 3 2009             view publication             pdf version

Government alcohol and drugs policy in disarray

The Government’s approach to tackling the problems of drugs, legal and illegal, was brought into severe question when the Home Secretary sacked its Chief Scientific Advisor on Drug Policy, Professor David Nutt, from his position as Chairman of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD). The sacking followed publication of a briefing on drug policy written by Professor Nutt for the Centre for Crime and Justice Studies at Kings College, London.

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Issue 2 2009             view publication             pdf version

"Supermarkets exhibiting the morality of a crack dealer" Select Committee told

The House of Commons Health Select Committee was told that “supermarkets are exhibiting the morality of a crack dealer” by expert witness Professor Martin Plant and he stated bluntly “Cheap alcohol kills people.” Professor Plant added ‘I think the option that the Chief Medical Officer and also the Scottish Government have picked of minimum unit pricing is very powerful because it has a trivial effect on the great majority of people who would only have to pay five or six pounds a year more for their alcohol; it would save 3000 lives a year; it would cut the number of days lost in absenteeism; it would cut hospital admissions and alcohol-related crimes by many, many thousands; it would also save a million pounds a year.”

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Issue 1 2009             view publication             pdf version

No alcohol for under fifteens

An alcohol-free childhood is the healthiest option, and if children do drink alcohol, it should not be before they reach the age of 15 years, according to new governmental advice to parents issued by the Chief Medical Officer.

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Issue 3 2008             view publication             pdf version

Licensing reforms branded an expensive failure by Local Government Association

In a survey of 51 local authorities, 49 primary care trusts and twenty police authorities, the Local Government Association (LGA) found that the government’s promise to reduce alcohol-related disorder through the Licensing Act 2003 has “failed dismally”.

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Issue 2 2008             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol tax increases 'will save thousands of lives' - Department of Health

The increases in excise duty and VAT on alcohol announced in the Budget in March will save 3,250 lives in England alone by the end of March 2013, according to the Department of Health.

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Issue 1 2008             view publication             pdf version

New Alcohol Health Alliance calls for tougher measures on alcohol

A new coalition launched in November is calling on the Government to do more to prevent the rise in alcohol-related diseases. The Alcohol Health Alliance UK is a ground-breaking coalition of 24 organisations, including the Institute of Alcohol Studies, and headed by the Royal College of Physicians. Its mission is to reduce alcohol related health harm which it says continues to spiral.

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Issue 3 2007             view publication             pdf version

Tackling teenage drinking 'one of Gordon Brown's top priorities'

Action against the binge drinking culture and among teenagers in particular was stated to be one of new Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s top priorities at the time of the Labour Party conference. The Sunday Telegraph reported that a drive against teenage excessive drinking will be led by Ed Balls, the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, and Jacqui Smith, the Home Secretary.

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Issue 2 2007             view publication             pdf version

Health warnings on bottles and new advice on alcohol and pregnancy

‘Sensible drinking‘ messages on bottles by the end of 2008 and new advice to avoid alcohol when pregnant or seeking to become pregnant are two key components of the new Alcohol Strategy. Both ideas immediately ran into controversy, the Government being accused of either going too far or not far enough. Interestingly, one accusation that might have been made but was not was that the Government has in effect now raised the ‘sensible drinking‘ limits. Despite this, and for entirely different reasons, some drinks companies were reported as threatening not to co-operate with the new labelling initiative.

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Issue 1 2007             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol 'nearly as harmful as heroin'

Britain’s system of classifying dangerous drugs is arbitrary and unscientific and should be changed to include alcohol and tobacco,which are more dangerous than many of the drugs that are presently listed.

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Issue 3 2006             view publication             pdf version

'Compulsory sobriety' or 'drunken freedom'? The role of the state in changing behaviour

Governments have long acted to curb or encourage particular behaviour amongst their citizens.Debates about the correct levels of government intervention and how this fits with personal responsibility are as old as democracy.The quotes in the title of this article are taken fromdebates about the 1872 Licensing Act,yet could have easily appeared in media coverage of more recent legislation on alcohol.

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Issue 2 2006             view publication             pdf version

Dying for a drink - Alcohol related death rates almost double since 1991

The alcohol-related death rate in the UK increased from 6.9 per 100,000 population in 1991 to 13.0 in 2004, according to data released by the Office for National Statistics. The number of alcohol-related deaths has more than doubled from 4,144 in 1991 to 8,380 in 2004.

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Issue 1 2006             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol related disease to 'rise markedly'

The burden of alcohol related gastrointestinal disease, alcoholic liver disease and pancreatitis, will increase markedly over the coming decade or more, according tothe British Society of Gastroenterology. Managing the health consequences of the rising tide of alcohol misuse in the United Kingdom will be one of the key challenges of the future, and much of it will fall to the gastroenterology and Hepatology services in acute hospitals, the Society concludes.

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Issue 3 2005             view publication             pdf version

Sad day dawns

24 hour licensing finally became a reality for England and Wales at midnight 24 November 2005, the so-called Second Appointed Day (SAD). Ironically, in view of repeated claims by government ministers that Scotland’s experience proves the case for licensing liberalisation, 24 hour licensing arrived south of the border just at the time it was being ruled against the public interest by the Scottish Parliament.

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Issue 2 2005             view publication             pdf version

A decade of failure - Self-regulation of alcohol advertising in Australia

1993 one of Australia’s foremost public health researchers concluded that unless the alcohol industry could demonstrate control over alcohol advertising the public could rightly demand that it be regulated by government (Hawks, 1993). A decade on, the latest system of self-regulation, administered from 1998 until 2003 by the alcohol industry, was found by government to have failed to operate effectively, despite the industry’s constant reassurance that the system could not be bettered.

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Issue 1 2005             view publication             pdf version

The Licensing Act

The government is beset by fierce opposition to the concept of twenty-four hour drinking allowed for in the Licensing Act. The medical establishment and the police have late in the day come out against the Act and there has been a vigorous campaign in the press, led by the Daily Mail. Just for good measure, the BBC conducted an opinion poll which showed two thirds of the population believe that the licensing changes will increase antisocial behaviour.

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Issue 3 2004             view publication             pdf version

End of the road for alcohol advertising...?

This is the judgement made by the Advertising Standards Authority, on which sits Jean Coussins, the director of the Alcohol Industry’s Portman Group on a complaint against a cinema advertisement for the Suffolk brewer Greene King. It speaks for itself: Date: 29th September 2004 Media: Cinema Sector: Alcohol Public Complaint From: Kent

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Issue 2 2004             view publication             pdf version

The licensing of disorder

Sometimes you really do have to rub your eyes at a world turned upside down. Our nannyish government which is trying so hard to stop us smoking or stuffing our faces with cream buns or behaving in other ways of which it disapproves is now encouraging us to take to the gaming tables.

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Issue 1 2004             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol Strategy

The Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy for England was finally published on 15th March 2004. Joy that the Strategy, eagerly awaited since 1998 was finally appearing soon gave way to dismay when it became obvious that the wait had not been worthwhile. As expected, the Strategy focuses strongly, - some argue disproportionately – on youthful `binge drinking’.

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Issue 3 2003             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol strategy questioned

The long-awaited Interim Analytical Report of the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit was finally published in September, months after it was originally promised. The Report is intended merely to describe the nature and scale of the problems and to summarise the available evidence in regard to methods of ameliorating them. The Government’s Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy, outlining the policies it intends to implement to tackle the problems, is not expected to appear for some time. The Government is saying publicly that it will appear as scheduled in late autumn, but it is widely believed that it will not in fact be published until next year.

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Issue 2 2003             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol related brain damage on the rise

Scotland is experiencing an increase in rates of alcohol related brain damage. It has some of the highest rates of this condition in the United Kingdom. The diagnosis is associated with deprivation and is occurring in younger people.

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Issue 1 2003             view publication             pdf version

How to get your Roxxoff

Brewer's droop may be a thing of the past: now you can booze and increase your libido at the same time. A new generation of alcopops, according to the manufacturers, is about to take the youth drinking market by storm. The claim is that the drinks will boost sexual performance and have already met with fierce condemnation on the grounds that they can only make the problem of binge drinking and unwanted pregnancies worse.

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Issue 3 2002             view publication             pdf version

At the bar of the house

The Licensing Bill, the most significant measure in alcohol policy for almost an hundred years, was announced in the Queen's Speech. Launching the Bill a few days later, appropriately in a London pub, Kim Howells, the Minister responsible for its safe passage onto the statute books made the startling assertion that when it came into force there would be an end to binge drinking and its consequent problems. Dr Howells clearly implied that binge drinking and disorder arising from drunkenness were phenomena which began with the introduction of licensing at the beginning of the last century. This will surprise anyone who knows anything about life in eighteenth century London, for example, or the nature of the mediaeval banquet, to say nothing of those models of moderate drinking, the Vikings, who apparently raped and pillaged fortified by nothing more than a Campari and soda sipped, in the Mediterranean fashion beloved of the Government, over the period of an hour at a pavement café.

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Issue 2 2002             view publication             pdf version

Now you see it, now you don't - the National Alcohol Strategy revisited

The national alcohol strategy, which has been repeatedly promised for four years and which has been subject to countless delays, appears to have been hit into the long grass and may lie there for some time. In more sedate days, a Royal Commission might have been set up and the issue would have disappeared forever; the Chairman would have received a knighthood but nothing much else would have happened. In this more urgent, modernised world, the problem disappears – in this case not forever but for "six months" - into the maw of the Strategy Unit, a division of the ever-expanding Cabinet Office. This is precisely what has happened to the subject of alcohol misuse and the thorny topic of the national strategy. In response to a parliamentary question, Douglas Alexander, Minister of State for the Cabinet Office, has announced that "the Prime Minister, Tony Blair, has asked the Strategy Unit to carry out a project looking at how to tackle the problems associated with alcohol misuse".

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Issue 1 2002             view publication             pdf version

Scottish National Alcohol Strategy calls time on binge drinking

Concerted action to tackle Scotland's 'lad' and 'ladette' culture is at the heart of a new Scottish Executive plan for action on alcohol problems launched in January.

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Issue 3 2001             view publication             pdf version

Lower the limit and save lives

Graham Buxton writes Drink-drivers killed and injured more people last year than they had for a decade.

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Issue 2 2001             view publication             pdf version

George Cruikshank's The Worship of Bacchus

Derek Rutherford discusses the background to a re-discovered painting

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Issue 1 2001             view publication             pdf version

Industry targets the young

"Scandal as drink bosses target our children" was the headline in the Daily Express. The article was inspired by the recent Eurocare publication, "Marketing Alcohol to Young People", an eye-catching brochure which brings together examples of advertisements from all over the world. The text shows how the drink industry cynically sets out to persuade the young to consume alcohol by making it appear glamourous, fashionable, and amusing. The advertisements associate alcohol with sporting and sexual prowess. Heroes of the football field play with the logo of a particular beer emblazoned across their chests. Beautiful young women imply a willingness to surrender to the man who swills a particular kind of booze. Perhaps most notoriously, there is the Carlsberg baby – a child of a few months who, in the colours of Liverpool FC, is already a living advertisement for Carlsberg lager.

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Issue 3 2000             view publication             pdf version

IAS response to Government Licensing proposals

Local Authorities and Alcohol Concern unhappy with the plans -If the Government expected a chorus of praise for its White Paper on Licensing Reform (see Alert, no.2, 2000), then it must be very disappointed. Criticism has come from a wide variety of sources, not simply from expert organisations such as the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS) and Alcohol Concern, but from local authorities of all political persuasions, such as Camden, Islington, and Westminster. Perhaps rather more unexpectedly, the Government's proposals have also been attacked by the body representing the nightclub industry.

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Issue 2 2000             view publication             pdf version

Time for Reform

Proposals for the Modernisation of Our Licensing Laws,published by The Stationery Office,available on 0845 023474 or

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Issue 1 2000             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol policy - what the public thinks

In what will be a shock to Government ministers, the majority of people say that it would be a bad thing to extend pub opening times at night and reject the concept of continental drinking. These are among the results of a national opinion poll recently conducted by NOP* on behalf of the Institute of Alcohol Studies.

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Issue 3 1999             view publication             pdf version

Alcohol policy sponsored by Bass - ...its like putting the wolf in charge of the sheepfold

The Conservative Government had an alcohol policy but failed to achieve its main targets. It simply fizzled out. Although the statistics relating to drink driving improved enormously, the ministers of the day refused to look for further advances by lowering the legal alcohol limit. Labour came to power on the promise of following this course and formulating a new and improved alcohol strategy. This was to be combined with far-reaching liberalisation of the licensing laws. Here we review the strange course of alcohol policy since the advent of the Labour Government.

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Issue 2 1999             view publication             pdf version

National Alcohol Strategy - Challenge to Government

There has been a huge increase in drinking among women and teenagers and a comprehensive national strategy is essential if the problem is to be tackled.

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Issue 1 1999             view publication             pdf version

Duty-free budget

A cheer went up in the House of Commons when, choosing his words carefully, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, said that duty on alcohol would not be increased before the Millennium. It seems that the most important thing was not to mar in any way the booze-up planned for the end of the century. The joy expressed by Members of Parliament was regardless of party, as though the wider implications of alcohol tax policy took second place to thecontinuation of cheap drink in the many bars available in the Palace of Westminster.

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Issue 3 1998             view publication             pdf version

Accident and Emergency

The mixture of alcohol and young people is putting a huge strain on the National Health Service and action needs to be taken now.

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Issue 2 1998             view publication             pdf version

World Cup fouled by drink and violence

The lottery of a penalty shoot-out may have brought England's World Cup campaign to an end, but it was the violence of drunken fans which marred the opening. The newspapers blazoned photographs of football supporters swilling beer, hurling missiles at rivals, conducting running battles with the French police, and generally causing mayhem. Reports stated that they were usually drunk and the pictures tended to confirm this. Television footage rarely showed a fan without a can or bottle, possibly the product of a World Cup sponsor, in his hand and as often as not failing to meet the challenge of communication.

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Issue 1 1998             view publication             pdf version

New lower legal limit on the way?

There is a question mark over the government's intention to lower the drink drive limit. Despite all indications being that this would have overwhelming public support, reports state that there are divisions in the Cabinet, with the Prime Minister himself remaining unconvinced. Ministers questioning the lower limit cite the "nanny state" image and damage to country pubs as their main concerns.

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Issue 2 1997             view publication             pdf version

Special supplement: 30 years of the breath test

 

Issue 1 1997             view publication             pdf version

Daily Express launches 'protect our children' campaign to halt alcopop production

Smash the alcopops says the Express Campaign in order to protect our children. Alcopops salesmen admit teen targeting says The Sunday Times. Feelings are certainly running high as awareness of the abuses surrounding alcopops become daily chatter in all walks of life. Police officers are shocked at the extent of the problem of underage drinking. At weekends, some children are getting so drunk that they have to be literally picked up off the streets and rushed to hospital. A 14 year old girl who had collapsed was found urinating in the street when police arrived.

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